Boundary Dam project – proving that coal-fueled energy is clean

This NatGeo article on the Boundary Dam project in Saskatchewan is a good, fast look at one attempt to employ carbon capture and storage technologies as a means of addressing CO2 emissions from coal-fueled energy.

Boundary Dam extracts 90 percent of the carbon from its smokestacks, then injects it into nearby oil wells to goose output. So far, it has captured 400,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide, according to its operator, SaskPower.

When it’s at full throttle by the end of this year, that number will go up to one million metric tons annually, SaskPower says—the same as taking more than 200,000 cars off the road. Its emissions would then be about one third that of a comparable new natural gas plant.

16. October 2015 by Jason Hayes
Categories: Canada, CCS, CCT, CO2, Emissions, Energy, Environment, Power Generation, Utilities | Tags: , , | Comments Off on Boundary Dam project – proving that coal-fueled energy is clean